Alice Ambrose – Featured as a UroMed Hometown Hero


Alice Ambrose a long time friend of the Association for the Bladder Exstrophy Community was featured as a UroMed Hometown Hero on the UroMed blog from May 14 – 20, 2012 at http://www.uromed.com/blog/

Below are the links to the articles written by John Phillips and posted on the UroMed Hometown Heroes Blog site:

PART 1 of 5

Alice Ambrose’s First 20 Years With Bladder Exstrophy

MAY 14, 2012 - UroMed Hometown Heroes - By John Phillips

Alice Ambrose is a role model and peer supporter for the ABC community nationwide.

Alice Ambrose is a role model and peer supporter for the ABC community nationwide.

Editor’s Note: Bladder exstrophy is a rare congenital birth defect that causes part of the bladder to be present outside of the body. Treatment includes surgical correction, but often leaves the patient with long term urological issues.

Alice Ambrose was born with bladder exstrophy and was left with an ostomy. She hid this from her peers for 20 years, but eventually told everyone after reconstructive surgery and an extended hospital stay. Alice has learned to be brave and honest when it comes to her condition and sets a great example about living a positive life. Part 1 of a 5 part series.

I was born in Seattle, Washington with bladder exstrophy. I grew up in Bellevue, a suburb of Seattle and had a very happy childhood. My mom and dad were loving, supportive and made sure I lived a normal life. I participated in the same activities as other kids and never felt singled out.

To read more of part 1 of 5 go to: http://www.uromed.com/blog/2012/05/14/alice-ambroses-first-20-years-with-bladder-exstrophy/

PART 2 of 5

Alice Ambrose Says Life Is All About Being Grateful For What You Have

MAY 15, 2012 UroMed Hometown Heroes - By John Phillips

Alice maintained a positive attitude and had bright plans for her future.

Alice maintained a positive attitude and had bright plans for her future.

Editor’s Note: Bladder exstrophy is a rare congenital birth defect that causes part of the bladder to be present outside of the body. Treatment includes surgical correction, but often leaves the patient with long term urological issues.

Alice Ambrose was born with bladder exstrophy and was left with anostomy. She hid this from her peers for 20 years, but eventually told everyone after reconstructive surgery and an extended hospital stay. Alice has learned to be brave and honest when it comes to her condition and sets a great example about living a positive life. Part 2 of a 5 part series.

When I was 20, I underwent a surgery that gave me a new bladder from a portion of my intestines. I told several of my peers, including my boyfriend at the time. I’m sure it was a bit of a shock for him, and he ended up breaking up with me. I probably should have told him sooner, but it was a challenge for me to let others know that I was different.

I started nursing school right after the surgery at the University of Washington, so I immediately became busy with classes. Sometimes, in the midst of classes and studying, I would ask myself, ”I wonder if anyone will ever love me again?” or, “I wonder if I’ll ever have kids of my own?”

To read more of part 2 of 5 go to: http://www.uromed.com/blog/2012/05/15/alice-ambrose-says-life-is-all-about-being-grateful-for-what-you-have/

PART 3 of 5

Alice Ambrose’s Honesty Lead To Love

MAY 16, 2012 –  UroMed Hometown Heroes - By John Phillips

Editor’s Note: Bladder exstrophy is a rare congenital birth defect that causes part of the bladder to be present outside of the body. Treatment includes surgical correction, but often leaves the patient with long term urological issues. Alice Ambrose was born with bladder exstrophy and was left with an ostomy. She hid this from her peers for 20 years, but eventually told everyone after reconstructive surgery and an extended hospital stay. Alice has learned to be brave and honest when it comes to her condition and sets a great example about living a positive life. Part 3 of a 5 part series.

I was really blessed. I had a job, I could support myself and I could help other people. In 1994, I was about to graduate from the nursing school at the University of Washington, and I decided to go back and say goodbye to one of the pastors who worked at the Covenant House campus ministry center. I met Brad Ambrose here. We started talking and found out we had some things in common. He was attending the church where my parents had gotten married, and his mom was a nurse. After I met him, I thought that he was really nice and that I’d like to get to know him, but later became busy with other obligations and forgot his name.

Alice was very blessed to have gotten a nursing degree so she can help others.

Alice felt very blessed to have earned a nursing degree so she can help others.

Summer came and went, and the job market for nurses wasn’t good. I had some time on my hands and started thinking about this guy I had only met one time, a few months earlier. I went back to see the pastor, who knew us both, and asked him for Brad’s name and telephone number. I went home, called Brad and said, “You probably don’t remember me, but we met a few of months ago at Covenant House on campus.” After talking, we decided to go out to lunch. Before I made the phone call, I kept telling myself, “I’m really interested in this guy, and I’d like to see him again. The worst thing he can say is no.” He agreed!

To read more of part 3 of 5 go to: http://www.uromed.com/blog/2012/05/16/alice-ambroses-honesty-lead-to-love-2/

PART 4 of 5

Brad Ambrose Asks Alice To Spend Forever With Him

MAY 18, 2012 -  UroMed Hometown Heroes - By John Phillips

Brad admired Alice's honesty and knew she was the one for him.

Brad admired Alice’s honesty and knew she was the one for him.

Editor’s Note: Brad Ambrose was focused on getting hisPh.D. in Physics. He admitted that he hadn’t dated very much, and then from out of nowhere, he met a girl named Alice. They talked and met for lunch, and both agreed that there was an attraction between them. Before Brad went home from graduate school toMassachusetts for Christmas, he got the news that the woman he was interested in had bladder exstrophy. What would he do, and what would he think? Today, he answers those questions. Part 4 of a 5 part series.

When Alice told me she had bladder exstrophy, the first thought that went through my mind was, “This is really brave of Alice to share with me about her condition, knowing we’ve only met a few months ago.” I knew that telling me was very important to Alice and deciding to share it with me took a lot of courage on her part. The only thing I could think to do at the time was to give her a hug and say, “Thanks for telling me.” I really didn’t have a question of whether or not I should enter into a relationship with Alice after she told me about her condition. I didn’t feel like Alice having bladder exstrophy closed any doors at all.

After that lunch date, I went home to be with my parents over the Christmas holidays. I realized how much I missed her generous heart and positive outlook on life. Those attributes not only impressed me but also drove me to her. I gradually realized that I didn’t want to be without Alice.

To read more of part 4 of 5 go to: http://www.uromed.com/blog/2012/05/18/brad-ambrose-asks-alice-to-spend-forever-with-him-2/

PART 5 of 5

As a Pediatric Nurse, Alice Ambrose Helps Others With Bladder Exstrophy

MAY 20, 2012 LEAVE A COMMENT

Alice is a pediatric nurse and enjoys working with children.

Alice is a pediatric nurse and enjoys working with children.

Editor’s Note: Alice Ambrose loves children, and because of the profession she’s chosen, she enjoys being with children every day. Part 5 of a 5 part series.

I was a pediatric homecare nurse for a while, and now, I’m a pediatric nurse at a doctor’s office. I assist with patients and triage phone calls for three pediatric urologists who see between 20 to 25 patients a day. I’m amazed at how many different people and children I come in contact with each day.

I’ve also organized a one weekend, summertime campout – the Great Lakes Exstrophy Campout - for the Great Lakes region, like I went to in Seattle, for families and people who have exstrophy. The campout provides an opportunity for them to meet each other, have a good time and share experiences.

I think the campout is especially good for siblings of people who have exstrophy as well, since they’re often the ones who feel somewhat left out of the family with the focus on the one with exstrophy. These families learn that you can go camping and swimming with exstrophy.

To read more of part 5 of 5 go to: http://www.uromed.com/blog/2012/05/20/as-a-pediatric-nurse-alice-ambrose-helps-others-with-bladder-exstrophy/

Categories: Courage to Shine News, Inspirational Stories | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

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One thought on “Alice Ambrose – Featured as a UroMed Hometown Hero

  1. Pingback: Alice Ambrose – My Story as told by UroMed Hometown Heroes « ABC Update Online

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